Comparison of a Welmar and Knight upright piano

Comparison of a Welmar and Knight Upright Piano


Models from the 60s to the c1980s

Welmar Upright Piano 1976

Welmar_120

Knight K10 Upright Piano c1967 – c1987.

knight1

Introduction

Both pianos are well made British pianos with an even touch and tone.
Knight pianos were sold alongside grand pianos in Steinway hall during this period and sold around the world as one of the most stable uprights available.

DETAILS


Welmar

RRP: £3200 (2013) when precisely reconditioned
DIMENSIONS: 121 hight x 143 length x 61 depth

Knight

RRP: £2,000 – £3,300 (2012) precisely reconditioned
DIMENSIONS: 112 hight x 140 length x 56 depth

THE TOUCH


The Welmar’s touch

welmar_upright_keys

The welmar uprights have an even touch, with a well adjusted action. Similar to the Knight pianos.

The Knight’s touch

knight_keys

Knight uprights have shorter keys but a well balanced action giving a very responsive touch

THE ACTION


The Welmar’s action

welmar_dampers_01

Slightly more mellow than Knights. The tone on the shorter Welmar uprights is very even, and superb on the taller ones.

The Knight’s action

knight_dampers_01

The bass strings are designed so that they cross the treble strings at a greater angle, thus they are longer. This extra length allows the Knight K10 to match the tone of bigger upright pianos such as the U1. Different Knight uprights may vary between a moderately mellow to a bright tone. This is often to do with the hardness of the hammer, and the pianos can often be toned. Knight uprights may be smaller than Yamaha ones but the richness of tone is comparable.

THE CASING


The Welmar’s casing

welmar_book_holders

The Knight’s casing

knight_book-holders

Neither piano originally came with book holders but due to the thickness of the wood material of the music desk, book holders can be fitted.

PEDALS


The Welmar’s Pedals

Welmar_Pedal_System

Most Welmar upright pianos do not have a third practice pedal, however, a practice lever may be fitted for an extra cost of £200+VAT. This system is the same as found in most modern pianos but is activated with a hand operated lever rather than a pedal.

The Knight’s Pedals

knight_pedals

Again, some Knight upright pianos do not have a third practice pedal, however, a practice lever may be fitted for an extra cost of £200+VAT. This system is the same as found in most modern pianos but is activated with a hand operated lever rather than a pedal.

CONCLUSION


Both of these makes are regarded by tuners and teachers as some of the best modern British uprights ever made. They are both extremely stable and are easily tuned. Knights usually have a brighter tone. The tall Welmars are among the best uprights in existence. So both are highly recommended.

NB buying a good used piano from this period is far better than buying a new piano such as the Yamaha B3 that has a plywood soundboard, making the tone sound dull in comparison.